Data & Research
UI Portal Employer Portal Claimant Portal
 
* ELMI Occupation Profile - Highway Maintenance Workers *
 
Highway Maintenance Workers
(O*NET 47-4051.00, SOC 47-4051)
What they do
Maintain highways, municipal and rural roads, airport runways, and rights-of-way. Duties include patching broken or eroded pavement, repairing guard rails, highway markers, and snow fences. May also mow or clear brush from along road or plow snow from roadway.
 
Also called:
Equipment Operator (EO), Highway Maintainer, Highway Maintenance Crew Worker, Highway Maintenance Technician, Highway Maintenance Worker, Maintenance Technician, Maintenance Worker, Transportation Maintenance Operator, Transportation Maintenance Specialist (TMS), Transportation Worker
 
 
Wages
Vermont - 2018
Percentile1HourlyYearly
10% $ 15.69   n/a  
25% $ 17.39   n/a  
Median $ 20.25   n/a  
75% $ 23.01   n/a  
90% $ 24.97   n/a  
 
Average $ 20.22   n/a  
1 What are Percentile Wages?
n/a - Information not available
More at CareerOneStop
 
Industries of Employment
United States - 2016
IndustryPercent of total
  • Local government, excluding education and hospitals
68%
  • State government, excluding education and hospitals
25%
  • Heavy and civil engineering construction
4%
  • Self-employed workers, all industries
1%
More at BLS
 
Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Public Safety and Security
    Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • English Language
    Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Transportation
    Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
  • Building and Construction
    Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Education and Training
    Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
More at O*NET
 
Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Operation and Control
    Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Operation Monitoring
    Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Coordination
    Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Monitoring
    Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Active Listening
    Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
More at O*NET
 
Interests
People in this career often prefer these work environments:
  • Realistic
    Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional
    Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
What are your interests? Take the O*NET Interest Profiler
 
Work Styles
People in this career will do well at jobs that need:
  • Dependability
    Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Concern for Others
    Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
  • Integrity
    Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Attention to Detail
    Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Cooperation
    Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
More at O*NET
 
Other Resources
  • CareerOneStop
    resource for job seekers, students, businessess and career professionals
  • O*NET Online
    nation's primary source of occupational information
 
Related Occupations
More at O*NET
 
 
Career Video
 
Projected Employment
 Vermont
2016 employment 1,548
2026 employment 1,554
Annual percent change
(compounded)
0.0%
Annual projected job openings
(due to change and separations)
156
More at Occupational Projections
 
Education and Experience:
  • Typical education needed for entry
    High school diploma or equivalent
  • Work experience in a related occupation
    No work experience
  • Typical on-the-job training needed to attain competency
    1 to 12 months on-the-job training
Based on BLS Education and Training Classifications
 
Job Zone
Some Preparation Needed
  • Specific Vocational Preparation Range
    (4.0 to < 6.0) - A typical worker will require over 3 months up to and including 1 year of training to achieve average performance in this occupation.
Based on O*Net Job Zones and SVP
 
Education Level
How much education do most people in this career have?
Education level Percent of
U.S. Workers
Doctoral or professional degree
or post-MA certificate
  0%
Master's degree or
post-BA certificate
  0%
Bachelor's degree   0%
Associate's degree   5%
Certificate or some college,
no degree
  1%
High school diploma
or equivalent
  88%
Less than high school diploma   5%
More at O*NET
 
Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Control Precision
    The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
  • Multilimb Coordination
    The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.
  • Arm-Hand Steadiness
    The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
  • Oral Comprehension
    The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Problem Sensitivity
    The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
More at O*NET
 
Work Activities
In general, what you might do:
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates
    Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
  • Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships
    Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.
  • Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work
    Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material
    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
  • Getting Information
    Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
More at O*NET
 
Detailed Work Activities
What you might do in a day:
  • Direct vehicle traffic.
  • Maintain mechanical equipment.
  • Drive trucks or truck-mounted equipment.
  • Install fencing or other barriers.
  • Remove debris or vegetation from work sites.
More at O*NET
 
Tasks
On the job, you would:
  • Set out signs and cones around work areas to divert traffic.
  • Flag motorists to warn them of obstacles or repair work ahead.
  • Perform preventative maintenance on vehicles and heavy equipment.
  • Drive trucks to transport crews and equipment to work sites.
  • Erect, install, or repair guardrails, road shoulders, berms, highway markers, warning signals, and highway lighting, using hand tools and power tools.
More at O*NET
 
O*NET in-it

This page includes information from the O*NET 24.0 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA.

BLS

This page includes information produced in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics and State Occupational Projecions programs.

 
 
 
 
Vermont.gov State of Vermont Department of Labor