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* ELMI Occupation Profile - Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers *
 
Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers
(O*NET 53-3032.00, SOC 53-3032)
What they do
Drive a tractor-trailer combination or a truck with a capacity of at least 26,000 pounds Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW). May be required to unload truck. Requires commercial drivers' license.
 
Also called:
Delivery Driver, Driver, Line Haul Driver, Log Truck Driver, Over the Road Driver (OTR Driver), Production Truck Driver, Road Driver, Semi Truck Driver, Tractor Trailer Operator, Truck Driver
 
 
Wages
Vermont - 2018
Percentile1HourlyYearly
10% $ 15.33   $31,890  
25% $ 17.35   $36,090  
Median $ 20.73   $43,110  
75% $ 25.14   $52,290  
90% $ 30.73   $63,910  
 
Average $ 21.76   $45,250  
1 What are Percentile Wages?
More at CareerOneStop
 
Industries of Employment
United States - 2016
IndustryPercent of total
  • Truck transportation
46%
  • Self-employed workers, all industries
8%
  • Merchant wholesalers, nondurable goods
7%
  • Nonmetallic mineral product manufacturing
3%
  • Merchant wholesalers, durable goods
3%
More at BLS
 
Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Transportation
    Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
  • Public Safety and Security
    Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Customer and Personal Service
    Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • English Language
    Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Mechanical
    Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
More at O*NET
 
Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Operation and Control
    Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Operation Monitoring
    Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Time Management
    Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Critical Thinking
    Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Monitoring
    Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
More at O*NET
 
Interests
People in this career often prefer these work environments:
  • Realistic
    Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional
    Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
What are your interests? Take the O*NET Interest Profiler
 
Work Styles
People in this career will do well at jobs that need:
  • Dependability
    Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Self Control
    Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
  • Attention to Detail
    Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Integrity
    Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Stress Tolerance
    Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
More at O*NET
 
Other Resources
  • CareerOneStop
    resource for job seekers, students, businessess and career professionals
  • O*NET Online
    nation's primary source of occupational information
 
Related Occupations
More at O*NET
 
 
Career Video
 
Projected Employment
 Vermont
2016 employment 4,351
2026 employment 4,294
Annual percent change
(compounded)
-0.1%
Annual projected job openings
(due to change and separations)
449
More at Occupational Projections
 
Education and Experience:
  • Typical education needed for entry
    Postsecondary non-degree award
  • Work experience in a related occupation
    No work experience
  • Typical on-the-job training needed to attain competency
    Less than 1 month on-the-job training
Based on BLS Education and Training Classifications
 
Job Zone
Some Preparation Needed
  • Specific Vocational Preparation Range
    (4.0 to < 6.0) - A typical worker will require over 3 months up to and including 1 year of training to achieve average performance in this occupation.
Based on O*Net Job Zones and SVP
 
Education Level
How much education do most people in this career have?
Education level Percent of
U.S. Workers
Doctoral or professional degree
or post-MA certificate
  0%
Master's degree or
post-BA certificate
  5%
Bachelor's degree   0%
Associate's degree   1%
Certificate or some college,
no degree
  19%
High school diploma
or equivalent
  56%
Less than high school diploma   19%
More at O*NET
 
Licensing
Vermont may require an occupational license:
Select a license for details
 
Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Control Precision
    The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
  • Far Vision
    The ability to see details at a distance.
  • Multilimb Coordination
    The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.
  • Near Vision
    The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Reaction Time
    The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.
More at O*NET
 
Work Activities
In general, what you might do:
  • Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment
    Running, maneuvering, navigating, or driving vehicles or mechanized equipment, such as forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material
    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
  • Getting Information
    Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events
    Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Controlling Machines and Processes
    Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).
More at O*NET
 
Detailed Work Activities
What you might do in a day:
  • Inspect motor vehicles.
  • Follow safety procedures for vehicle operation.
  • Inspect cargo to ensure it is properly loaded or secured.
  • Record operational or production data.
  • Record service or repair activities.
More at O*NET
 
Tasks
On the job, you would:
  • Check vehicles to ensure that mechanical, safety, and emergency equipment is in good working order.
  • Follow appropriate safety procedures for transporting dangerous goods.
  • Inspect loads to ensure that cargo is secure.
  • Maintain logs of working hours or of vehicle service or repair status, following applicable state and federal regulations.
  • Secure cargo for transport, using ropes, blocks, chain, binders, or covers.
More at O*NET
 
O*NET in-it

This page includes information from the O*NET 24.0 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA.

BLS

This page includes information produced in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics and State Occupational Projecions programs.

 
 
 
 
Vermont.gov State of Vermont Department of Labor