Data & Research
 
* ELMI Occupation Profile - Umpires, Referees, and Other Sports Officials *
 
Umpires, Referees, and Other Sports Officials
(O*NET 27-2023.00, SOC 27-2023)
What they do
Officiate at competitive athletic or sporting events. Detect infractions of rules and decide penalties according to established regulations. Includes all sporting officials, referees, and competition judges.
 
Also called:
Basketball Referee, Commissioner of Officials, Director of Officiating, Diving Judge, Horse Show Judge, Major League Baseball Umpire, Referee, Softball Umpire, Sports Official, Supervisor of Officials
 
 
Wages
Vermont - 2020
Percentile1HourlyYearly
10% n/a   $23,550  
25% n/a   $24,850  
Median n/a   $32,400  
75% n/a   $52,840  
90% n/a   $60,740  
 
Average n/a   $39,210  
1 What are Percentile Wages?
n/a - Information not available
More at CareerOneStop
 
Industries of Employment
United States - 2018
IndustryPercent of total
  • Local government, excluding education and hospitals
34%
  • Amusement, gambling, and recreation industries
19%
  • Performing arts, spectator sports, and related industries
13%
  • Religious, grantmaking, civic, professional, and similar organizations
13%
  • Educational services; state, local, and private
9%
More at BLS
 
Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Education and Training
    Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • English Language
    Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
More at O*NET
 
Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Critical Thinking
    Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Speaking
    Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Judgment and Decision Making
    Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Active Learning
    Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Active Listening
    Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
More at O*NET
 
Interests
People in this career often prefer these work environments:
  • Realistic
    Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Enterprising
    Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional
    Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
What are your interests? Take the O*NET Interest Profiler
 
Work Styles
People in this career will do well at jobs that need:
  • Integrity
    Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Self Control
    Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
  • Stress Tolerance
    Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
  • Dependability
    Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Attention to Detail
    Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
More at O*NET
 
Other Resources
  • CareerOneStop
    resource for job seekers, students, businessess and career professionals
  • O*NET Online
    nation's primary source of occupational information
 
Related Occupations
More at O*NET
 
 
Career Video
 
Projected Employment
 Vermont
2018 employment 69
2028 employment 72
Annual percent change
(compounded)
0.4%
Annual projected job openings
(due to change and separations)
10
More at Occupational Projections
 
Education and Experience:
  • Typical education needed for entry
    High school diploma or equivalent
  • Work experience in a related occupation
    None
  • Typical on-the-job training needed to attain competency
    Moderate-term on-the-job training
Based on BLS Education and Training Classifications
 
Job Zone
Medium Preparation Needed
  • Specific Vocational Preparation Range
    (6.0 to < 7.0) - A typical worker will require over 1 year up to and including 2 years of training to achieve average performance in this occupation.
Based on O*Net Job Zones and SVP
 
Education Level
How much education do most people in this career have?
Education level Percent of
U.S. Workers
Doctoral or professional degree
or post-MA certificate
  0%
Master's degree or
post-BA certificate
  0%
Bachelor's degree   10%
Associate's degree   3%
Certificate or some college,
no degree
  13%
High school diploma
or equivalent
  55%
Less than high school diploma   19%
More at O*NET
 
Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Far Vision
    The ability to see details at a distance.
  • Near Vision
    The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Oral Expression
    The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Speech Clarity
    The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  • Oral Comprehension
    The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
More at O*NET
 
Work Activities
In general, what you might do:
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
    Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates
    Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
  • Getting Information
    Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge
    Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
  • Performing General Physical Activities
    Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
More at O*NET
 
Detailed Work Activities
What you might do in a day:
  • Coordinate athletic or sporting events or activities.
  • Evaluate skills of athletes or performers.
  • Verify accuracy of data.
  • Compile technical information or documentation.
  • Coach others.
More at O*NET
 
Tasks
On the job, you would:
  • Officiate at sporting events, games, or competitions, to maintain standards of play and to ensure that game rules are observed.
  • Signal participants or other officials to make them aware of infractions or to otherwise regulate play or competition.
  • Inspect sporting equipment or examine participants to ensure compliance with event and safety regulations.
  • Keep track of event times, including race times and elapsed time during game segments, starting or stopping play when necessary.
  • Judge performances in sporting competitions to award points, impose scoring penalties, and determine results.
More at O*NET
 
O*NET in-it

This page includes information from the O*NET 25.0 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA.

BLS

This page includes information produced in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics and State Occupational Projecions programs.

 
 
 
 
Vermont.gov State of Vermont Department of Labor