Data & Research
 
* ELMI Occupation Profile - Elevator Installers and Repairers *
 
Elevator Installers and Repairers
(O*NET 47-4021.00, SOC 47-4021)
What they do
Assemble, install, repair, or maintain electric or hydraulic freight or passenger elevators, escalators, or dumbwaiters.
 
Also called:
Elevator Adjuster, Elevator Constructor, Elevator Mechanic, Elevator Repair and Maintenance Technician, Elevator Service Mechanic, Elevator Service Technician, Elevator Serviceman, Elevator Technician, Elevator Troubleshooter, Escalator Service Mechanic
 
 
Wages
Wage rates not available for Vermont
but may be for the nation and other states at
CareerOneStop
 
Industries of Employment
United States - 2018
IndustryPercent of total
  • Specialty trade contractors
91%
  • Merchant wholesalers, durable goods
3%
  • Local government, excluding education and hospitals
2%
  • Machinery manufacturing
2%
  • Educational services; state, local, and private
1%
More at BLS
 
Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Mechanical
    Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Customer and Personal Service
    Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Building and Construction
    Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Public Safety and Security
    Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Design
    Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
More at O*NET
 
Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Repairing
    Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
  • Troubleshooting
    Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Equipment Maintenance
    Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
  • Equipment Selection
    Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
  • Operation Monitoring
    Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
More at O*NET
 
Interests
People in this career often prefer these work environments:
  • Realistic
    Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative
    Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Conventional
    Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
What are your interests? Take the O*NET Interest Profiler
 
Work Styles
People in this career will do well at jobs that need:
  • Attention to Detail
    Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Dependability
    Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Analytical Thinking
    Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
  • Persistence
    Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
  • Independence
    Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
More at O*NET
 
Other Resources
  • CareerOneStop
    resource for job seekers, students, businessess and career professionals
  • O*NET Online
    nation's primary source of occupational information
 
Related Occupations
More at O*NET
 
 
Career Video
 
Projected Employment
Projected employment not available for Vermont
but may be for the nation and other states at
CareerOneStop
 
Education and Experience:
  • Typical education needed for entry
    High school diploma or equivalent
  • Work experience in a related occupation
    None
  • Typical on-the-job training needed to attain competency
    Apprenticeship
Based on BLS Education and Training Classifications
 
Job Zone
Medium Preparation Needed
  • Specific Vocational Preparation Range
    (6.0 to < 7.0) - A typical worker will require over 1 year up to and including 2 years of training to achieve average performance in this occupation.
Based on O*Net Job Zones and SVP
 
Education Level
How much education do most people in this career have?
Education level Percent of
U.S. Workers
Doctoral or professional degree
or post-MA certificate
  9%
Master's degree or
post-BA certificate
  0%
Bachelor's degree   3%
Associate's degree   8%
Certificate or some college,
no degree
  40%
High school diploma
or equivalent
  40%
Less than high school diploma   0%
More at O*NET
 
Licensing
Vermont may require an occupational license:
Select a license for details
 
Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Problem Sensitivity
    The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • Deductive Reasoning
    The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • Oral Comprehension
    The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Arm-Hand Steadiness
    The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
  • Oral Expression
    The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
More at O*NET
 
Work Activities
In general, what you might do:
  • Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment
    Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of mechanical (not electronic) principles.
  • Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment
    Servicing, repairing, calibrating, regulating, fine-tuning, or testing machines, devices, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of electrical or electronic (not mechanical) principles.
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
    Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Performing General Physical Activities
    Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
  • Handling and Moving Objects
    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
More at O*NET
 
Detailed Work Activities
What you might do in a day:
  • Assemble products or production equipment.
  • Maintain mechanical equipment.
  • Inspect industrial or commercial equipment to ensure proper operation.
  • Evaluate construction projects to determine compliance with external standards or regulations.
  • Locate equipment or materials in need of repair or replacement.
More at O*NET
 
Tasks
On the job, you would:
  • Assemble, install, repair, and maintain elevators, escalators, moving sidewalks, and dumbwaiters, using hand and power tools, and testing devices such as test lamps, ammeters, and voltmeters.
  • Test newly installed equipment to ensure that it meets specifications, such as stopping at floors for set amounts of time.
  • Locate malfunctions in brakes, motors, switches, and signal and control systems, using test equipment.
  • Check that safety regulations and building codes are met, and complete service reports verifying conformance to standards.
  • Connect electrical wiring to control panels and electric motors.
More at O*NET
 
O*NET in-it

This page includes information from the O*NET 25.0 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA.

BLS

This page includes information produced in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics and State Occupational Projecions programs.

 
 
 
 
Vermont.gov State of Vermont Department of Labor