Data & Research
 
* ELMI Occupation Profile - Tile and Marble Setters *
 
Tile and Marble Setters
(O*NET 47-2044.00, SOC 47-2044)
What they do
Apply hard tile, marble, and wood tile to walls, floors, ceilings, and roof decks.
 
Also called:
Ceramic Tile Mechanic, Ceramic Tile Setter, Marble Mason, Tile and Marble Installer, Tile and Marble Setter, Tile Finisher, Tile Installer, Tile Mason, Tile Mechanic, Tile Setter
 
 
Wages
Tile and Stone Setters*
Vermont - 2020
Percentile1HourlyYearly
10% $ 19.06   n/a  
25% $ 20.67   n/a  
Median $ 22.76   n/a  
75% $ 24.85   n/a  
90% $ 28.65   n/a  
 
Average $ 22.87   n/a  
* You're seeing information for "Tile and Stone Setters" because it includes "Tile and Marble Setters" for which wage information is not available.
1 What are Percentile Wages?
n/a - Information not available
More at CareerOneStop
 
Industries of Employment
United States - 2018
IndustryPercent of total
  • Specialty trade contractors
56%
  • Self-employed workers
28%
  • Nonmetallic mineral product manufacturing
5%
  • Construction of buildings
4%
  • Furniture and home furnishings stores
2%
More at BLS
 
Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Building and Construction
    Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • English Language
    Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Mathematics
    Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
More at O*NET
 
Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Critical Thinking
    Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Listening
    Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Coordination
    Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Speaking
    Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Mathematics
    Using mathematics to solve problems.
More at O*NET
 
Interests
People in this career often prefer these work environments:
  • Realistic
    Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional
    Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  • Artistic
    Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
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Work Styles
People in this career will do well at jobs that need:
  • Attention to Detail
    Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Dependability
    Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Integrity
    Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Independence
    Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
  • Cooperation
    Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
More at O*NET
 
Other Resources
  • CareerOneStop
    resource for job seekers, students, businessess and career professionals
  • O*NET Online
    nation's primary source of occupational information
 
Related Occupations
More at O*NET
 
 
Career Video
 
Projected Employment
Projected employment not available for Vermont
but may be for the nation and other states at
CareerOneStop
 
Education and Experience:
  • Typical education needed for entry
    No formal educational credential
  • Work experience in a related occupation
    None
  • Typical on-the-job training needed to attain competency
    Long-term on-the-job training
Based on BLS Education and Training Classifications
 
Job Zone
Some Preparation Needed
  • Specific Vocational Preparation Range
    (4.0 to < 6.0) - A typical worker will require over 3 months up to and including 1 year of training to achieve average performance in this occupation.
Based on O*Net Job Zones and SVP
 
Education Level
How much education do most people in this career have?
Education level Percent of
U.S. Workers
Doctoral or professional degree
or post-MA certificate
  0%
Master's degree or
post-BA certificate
  0%
Bachelor's degree   0%
Associate's degree   0%
Certificate or some college,
no degree
  17%
High school diploma
or equivalent
  31%
Less than high school diploma   51%
More at O*NET
 
Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Extent Flexibility
    The ability to bend, stretch, twist, or reach with your body, arms, and/or legs.
  • Trunk Strength
    The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without 'giving out' or fatiguing.
  • Visualization
    The ability to imagine how something will look after it is moved around or when its parts are moved or rearranged.
  • Near Vision
    The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Problem Sensitivity
    The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
More at O*NET
 
Work Activities
In general, what you might do:
  • Handling and Moving Objects
    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
  • Getting Information
    Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Performing General Physical Activities
    Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
    Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Estimating the Quantifiable Characteristics of Products, Events, or Information
    Estimating sizes, distances, and quantities; or determining time, costs, resources, or materials needed to perform a work activity.
More at O*NET
 
Detailed Work Activities
What you might do in a day:
  • Cut tile, stone, or other masonry materials.
  • Install masonry materials.
  • Align masonry materials.
  • Estimate construction project costs.
  • Estimate construction project labor requirements.
More at O*NET
 
Tasks
On the job, you would:
  • Cut and shape tile to fit around obstacles and into odd spaces and corners, using hand and power cutting tools.
  • Lay and set mosaic tiles to create decorative wall, mural, and floor designs.
  • Align and straighten tile using levels, squares, and straightedges.
  • Determine and implement the best layout to achieve a desired pattern.
  • Measure and mark surfaces to be tiled, following blueprints.
More at O*NET
 
O*NET in-it

This page includes information from the O*NET 25.0 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA.

BLS

This page includes information produced in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics and State Occupational Projecions programs.

 
 
 
 
Vermont.gov State of Vermont Department of Labor