Data & Research
 
* ELMI Occupation Profile - Carpet Installers *
 
Carpet Installers
(O*NET 47-2041.00, SOC 47-2041)
What they do
Lay and install carpet from rolls or blocks on floors. Install padding and trim flooring materials.
 
Also called:
Carpet Installer, Carpet Installer Helper, Carpet Layer, Carpet Mechanic, Commercial Floor Covering Installer, Floor Coverer, Floor Covering Installer, Floor Installation Mechanic, Flooring Installer, Installer
 
 
Wages
Vermont - 2020
Percentile1HourlyYearly
10% $ 16.41   n/a  
25% $ 18.26   n/a  
Median $ 21.73   n/a  
75% $ 26.18   n/a  
90% $ 39.61   n/a  
 
Average $ 24.20   n/a  
1 What are Percentile Wages?
n/a - Information not available
More at CareerOneStop
 
Industries of Employment
United States - 2018
IndustryPercent of total
  • Specialty trade contractors
44%
  • Self-employed workers
28%
  • Furniture and home furnishings stores
21%
  • Construction of buildings
2%
  • Merchant wholesalers, durable goods
1%
More at BLS
 
Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Customer and Personal Service
    Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Mathematics
    Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Administration and Management
    Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • English Language
    Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Building and Construction
    Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
More at O*NET
 
Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Coordination
    Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Monitoring
    Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Critical Thinking
    Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Mathematics
    Using mathematics to solve problems.
  • Quality Control Analysis
    Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
More at O*NET
 
Interests
People in this career often prefer these work environments:
  • Realistic
    Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Enterprising
    Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
What are your interests? Take the O*NET Interest Profiler
 
Work Styles
People in this career will do well at jobs that need:
  • Attention to Detail
    Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Dependability
    Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Integrity
    Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Cooperation
    Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
  • Independence
    Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
More at O*NET
 
Other Resources
  • CareerOneStop
    resource for job seekers, students, businessess and career professionals
  • O*NET Online
    nation's primary source of occupational information
 
Related Occupations
More at O*NET
 
 
Career Video
 
Projected Employment
 Vermont
2018 employment 193
2028 employment 178
Annual percent change
(compounded)
-0.8%
Annual projected job openings
(due to change and separations)
16
More at Occupational Projections
 
Education and Experience:
  • Typical education needed for entry
    No formal educational credential
  • Work experience in a related occupation
    None
  • Typical on-the-job training needed to attain competency
    Short-term on-the-job training
Based on BLS Education and Training Classifications
 
Job Zone
Some Preparation Needed
  • Specific Vocational Preparation Range
    (4.0 to < 6.0) - A typical worker will require over 3 months up to and including 1 year of training to achieve average performance in this occupation.
Based on O*Net Job Zones and SVP
 
Education Level
How much education do most people in this career have?
Education level Percent of
U.S. Workers
Doctoral or professional degree
or post-MA certificate
  0%
Master's degree or
post-BA certificate
  0%
Bachelor's degree   0%
Associate's degree   0%
Certificate or some college,
no degree
  8%
High school diploma
or equivalent
  69%
Less than high school diploma   22%
More at O*NET
 
Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Extent Flexibility
    The ability to bend, stretch, twist, or reach with your body, arms, and/or legs.
  • Problem Sensitivity
    The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • Trunk Strength
    The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without 'giving out' or fatiguing.
  • Near Vision
    The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Static Strength
    The ability to exert maximum muscle force to lift, push, pull, or carry objects.
More at O*NET
 
Work Activities
In general, what you might do:
  • Performing General Physical Activities
    Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
  • Handling and Moving Objects
    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
  • Getting Information
    Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material
    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
    Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
More at O*NET
 
Detailed Work Activities
What you might do in a day:
  • Cut carpet, vinyl or other flexible materials.
  • Measure materials or objects for installation or assembly.
  • Inspect work sites to determine condition or necessary repairs.
  • Mark reference points on construction materials.
  • Prepare surfaces for finishing.
More at O*NET
 
Tasks
On the job, you would:
  • Inspect the surface to be covered to determine its condition, and correct any imperfections that might show through carpet or cause carpet to wear unevenly.
  • Roll out, measure, mark, and cut carpeting to size with a carpet knife, following floor sketches and allowing extra carpet for final fitting.
  • Join edges of carpet and seam edges where necessary, by sewing or by using tape with glue and heated carpet iron.
  • Cut and trim carpet to fit along wall edges, openings, and projections, finishing the edges with a wall trimmer.
  • Plan the layout of the carpet, allowing for expected traffic patterns and placing seams for best appearance and longest wear.
More at O*NET
 
O*NET in-it

This page includes information from the O*NET 25.0 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA.

BLS

This page includes information produced in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics and State Occupational Projecions programs.

 
 
 
 
Vermont.gov State of Vermont Department of Labor