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* ELMI Occupation Report *
 
Crossing Guards

Guide or control vehicular or pedestrian traffic at such places as streets, schools, railroad crossings, or construction sites.   (O'Net 33-9091.00)

 
Reported job titles:   Adult Crossing Guard, Construction Site Crossing Guard, Crossing Flagman, Crossing Gateman, Crossing Guard, Crossing Tender   (view all job titles)
 
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  • Wages
  • Employment Trends
  • Industries of Employment
  • Tasks
  • Knowledge
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  • Abilities
  • Work Activities
  • Interests
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    Career Video
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    Wages
    for Crossing Guards
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     Location Pay
    Period
    2015
    Percentile Wages Average
    Wage
    10% 25% 50%
    Median
    75% 90%
     Vermont Hourly $ 9.93   $ 10.74   $ 12.68   $ 17.47   $ 20.62   $ 14.19  
    Yearly $20,650   $22,340   $26,380   $36,340   $42,890   $29,510  
     
     Burlington-South Burlington, VT Metropolitan NECTA Hourly $ 10.14   $ 11.01   $ 13.08   $ 20.10   $ 22.44   $ 14.89  
    Yearly $21,090   $22,900   $27,200   $41,800   $46,670   $30,980  
     
     Southern Vermont Balance of State Hourly $ 9.91   $ 10.62   $ 11.80   $ 17.39   $ 20.30   $ 14.01  
    Yearly $20,620   $22,090   $24,540   $36,170   $42,220   $29,140  
     
     Northern Vermont Balance of State Hourly $ 9.62   $ 11.26   $ 14.94   $ 16.92   $ 18.08   $ 14.08  
    Yearly $20,020   $23,420   $31,070   $35,190   $37,610   $29,290  
     
    What are Percentile Wages?
    source: Occupational Employment Statistics, Vermont Labor Market Information, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, released April 2016.
    Note: 2015 release includes new geographic definitions based on 2010 Census.
     


    Employment Trends
    for Crossing Guards
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    Location Employment Annual % change
    (compounded)
    Annual job openings
    (due to growth and
    net replacements)
    2012 2022
    Vermont 306 351 1.4% 9
    Burlington-South Burlington, VT Metropolitan NECTA 178 218 2.0% 7
    Southern Vermont Balance of State 63 69 0.9% 2
    Northern Vermont Balance of State 60 63 0.5% 1
    Note: Substate areas are based on 2005 definitions from 2000 Census. 2014-2024 estimates, released in 2016, will be based on new area definitions from 2010 Census.
    source: Employment Projections, Vermont Economic & Labor Market Information, in cooperation with U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, statewide estimates released August 2014, area estimates released October 2014.
     


    Industries of Employment
    for Crossing Guards
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    Industry Vermont
    2012
    Employment
    Percent
    of Total
    Total All Industries 306 100%
    Administrative and Support and Waste Management and Remediation Services 130 42%
    Administrative and Support Services 130 42%
    Professional and Business Services 130 42%
    Education and Health Services 109 36%
    Educational Services 109 36%
    Educational Services 109 36%
    source: Employment Projections, Vermont Economic & Labor Market Information, in cooperation with U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, released August 2014.
     


    Tasks
    for Crossing Guards
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  • Monitor traffic flow to locate safe gaps through which pedestrians can cross streets.
     
  • Direct or escort pedestrians across streets, stopping traffic as necessary.
     
  • Guide or control vehicular or pedestrian traffic at such places as street and railroad crossings and construction sites.
     
  • Communicate traffic and crossing rules and other information to students and adults.
     
  • Report unsafe behavior of children to school officials.
     
  • Record license numbers of vehicles disregarding traffic signals, and report infractions to appropriate authorities.
     
  • Direct traffic movement or warn of hazards, using signs, flags, lanterns, and hand signals.
     
  • Learn the location and purpose of street traffic signs within assigned patrol areas.
     
  • Stop speeding vehicles to warn drivers of traffic laws.
     
  • Distribute traffic control signs and markers at designated points.
     
    source: Occupational Information Network: Crossing Guards  updated December 2006
     


    Knowledge
    for Crossing Guards
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  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
     
    source: Occupational Information Network: Crossing Guards  updated December 2006
     


    Skills
    for Crossing Guards
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  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
     
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
     
  • Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
     
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
     
  • Service Orientation - Actively looking for ways to help people.
     
    source: Occupational Information Network: Crossing Guards  updated June 2010
     


    Abilities
    for Crossing Guards
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  • Oral Expression - The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
     
  • Oral Comprehension - The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
     
  • Problem Sensitivity - The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
     
  • Speech Clarity - The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
     
  • Deductive Reasoning - The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
     
  • Near Vision - The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
     
  • Speech Recognition - The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.
     
  • Inductive Reasoning - The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
     
    source: Occupational Information Network: Crossing Guards  updated December 2006
     


    Work Activities
    for Crossing Guards
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  • Performing for or Working Directly with the Public - Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.
     
  • Assisting and Caring for Others - Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.
     
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates - Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
     
  • Communicating with Persons Outside Organization - Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.
     
  • Performing General Physical Activities - Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
     
  • Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships - Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.
     
  • Getting Information - Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
     
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems - Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
     
    source: Occupational Information Network: Crossing Guards  updated December 2006
     


    Interests
    for Crossing Guards
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  • Social - Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
     
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
     
  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
     
    source: Occupational Information Network: Crossing Guards  updated June 2008
     


    Work Styles
    for Crossing Guards
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  • Dependability - Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
     
  • Concern for Others - Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
     
  • Integrity - Job requires being honest and ethical.
     
  • Attention to Detail - Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
     
  • Cooperation - Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
     
  • Independence - Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
     
  • Self Control - Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
     
    source: Occupational Information Network: Crossing Guards  updated December 2006
     


    State of Vermont License Information
    that may be required for Crossing Guards
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    No state licenses listed for this occupation.
     


    Education and Training Requirements
    for Crossing Guards
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  • Job Zone One: Little or No Preparation Needed
  •  
  • Education: Some of these occupations may require a high school diploma or GED certificate.
  •  
  • Training: Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few days to a few months of training. Usually, an experienced worker could show you how to do the job.
  •  
  • Experience: Little or no previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, a person can become a waiter or waitress even if he/she has never worked before.
  •  
    source: Occupational Information Network: Crossing Guards  updated December 2006
     


    Schools
    offering instructional programs related to Crossing Guards
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    No school information for this occupation.
     


    Other Resources
    for Crossing Guards
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  • Labor Exchange Information
  • A source for occupational characteristics, such as age, gender, race, and years of education and an alternative source for occupational wage rates. Limited to people looking for jobs and the jobs advertised through VDOL Vermont Job Link.
  • Look for statewide information over the latest 12 months for Crossing Guards.
  •  
  • Occupational Outlook Handbook
  • No handbook information for this occupation.
     
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    Related Occupations
    Occupations with skill requirements similar to Crossing Guards
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  • Amusement and Recreation Attendants
  •  
  • Cooks, Fast Food
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  • Dining Room and Cafeteria Attendants and Bartender Helpers
  •  
  • Food Servers, Nonrestaurant
  •  
  • Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners
  •  
  • Stock Clerks- Stockroom, Warehouse, or Storage Yard
  •  
  • Ushers, Lobby Attendants, and Ticket Takers
  •  
  • Waiters and Waitresses
  •  
    source: Occupational Information Network: Crossing Guards 
     

     
     
     
    Vermont.gov State of Vermont Department of Labor