Data & Research
 
* ELMI Occupation Profile - Set and Exhibit Designers *
 
Set and Exhibit Designers
(O*NET 27-1027.00, SOC 27-1027)
What they do
Design special exhibits and movie, television, and theater sets. May study scripts, confer with directors, and conduct research to determine appropriate architectural styles.
 
Also called:
Design Chief, Designer, Display Coordinator, Exhibit Designer, Exhibit Preparator, Production Designer, Scenic Designer, Set Decorator, Set Designer, Show Design Supervisor
 
 
Wages
Wage rates not available for Vermont
but may be for the nation and other states at
CareerOneStop
 
Industries of Employment
United States - 2018
IndustryPercent of total
  • Motion picture and sound recording industries
26%
  • Self-employed workers
21%
  • Performing arts, spectator sports, and related industries
17%
  • Professional, scientific, and technical services
8%
  • Educational services; state, local, and private
6%
More at BLS
 
Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Design
    Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Fine Arts
    Knowledge of the theory and techniques required to compose, produce, and perform works of music, dance, visual arts, drama, and sculpture.
  • English Language
    Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Building and Construction
    Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Communications and Media
    Knowledge of media production, communication, and dissemination techniques and methods. This includes alternative ways to inform and entertain via written, oral, and visual media.
More at O*NET
 
Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Active Listening
    Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Critical Thinking
    Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Reading Comprehension
    Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Coordination
    Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Operations Analysis
    Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design.
More at O*NET
 
Interests
People in this career often prefer these work environments:
  • Artistic
    Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
  • Realistic
    Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
What are your interests? Take the O*NET Interest Profiler
 
Work Styles
People in this career will do well at jobs that need:
  • Attention to Detail
    Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Dependability
    Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Initiative
    Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
  • Cooperation
    Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
  • Innovation
    Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
More at O*NET
 
Other Resources
  • CareerOneStop
    resource for job seekers, students, businessess and career professionals
  • O*NET Online
    nation's primary source of occupational information
 
Related Occupations
More at O*NET
 
 
Career Video
 
Projected Employment
Projected employment not available for Vermont
but may be for the nation and other states at
CareerOneStop
 
Education and Experience:
  • Typical education needed for entry
    Bachelor's degree
  • Work experience in a related occupation
    None
  • Typical on-the-job training needed to attain competency
    None
Based on BLS Education and Training Classifications
 
Job Zone
Extensive Preparation Needed
  • Specific Vocational Preparation Range
    (8.0 and above) - A typical worker will require over 4 years up to and including 10 years or more of training to achieve average performance in this occupation.
Based on O*Net Job Zones and SVP
 
Education Level
How much education do most people in this career have?
Education level Percent of
U.S. Workers
Doctoral or professional degree
or post-MA certificate
  17%
Master's degree or
post-BA certificate
  35%
Bachelor's degree   39%
Associate's degree   4%
Certificate or some college,
no degree
  4%
High school diploma
or equivalent
  0%
Less than high school diploma   0%
More at O*NET
 
Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Fluency of Ideas
    The ability to come up with a number of ideas about a topic (the number of ideas is important, not their quality, correctness, or creativity).
  • Originality
    The ability to come up with unusual or clever ideas about a given topic or situation, or to develop creative ways to solve a problem.
  • Oral Comprehension
    The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Visualization
    The ability to imagine how something will look after it is moved around or when its parts are moved or rearranged.
  • Oral Expression
    The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
More at O*NET
 
Work Activities
In general, what you might do:
  • Thinking Creatively
    Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
    Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Drafting, Laying Out, and Specifying Technical Devices, Parts, and Equipment
    Providing documentation, detailed instructions, drawings, or specifications to tell others about how devices, parts, equipment, or structures are to be fabricated, constructed, assembled, modified, maintained, or used.
  • Getting Information
    Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work
    Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.
More at O*NET
 
Detailed Work Activities
What you might do in a day:
  • Draw detailed or technical illustrations.
  • Develop artistic or design concepts for decoration, exhibition, or commercial purposes.
  • Study scripts to determine project requirements.
  • Collaborate with others to determine technical details of productions.
  • Confer with clients to determine needs.
More at O*NET
 
Tasks
On the job, you would:
  • Prepare rough drafts and scale working drawings of sets, including floor plans, scenery, and properties to be constructed.
  • Read scripts to determine location, set, and design requirements.
  • Develop set designs, based on evaluation of scripts, budgets, research information, and available locations.
  • Attend rehearsals and production meetings to obtain and share information related to sets.
  • Confer with clients and staff to gather information about exhibit space, proposed themes and content, timelines, budgets, materials, or promotion requirements.
More at O*NET
 
O*NET in-it

This page includes information from the O*NET 25.0 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA.

BLS

This page includes information produced in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics and State Occupational Projecions programs.

 
 
 
 
Vermont.gov State of Vermont Department of Labor