Data & Research
 
* ELMI Occupation Profile - Fine Artists, Including Painters, Sculptors, and Illustrators *
 
Fine Artists, Including Painters, Sculptors, and Illustrators
(O*NET 27-1013.00, SOC 27-1013)
What they do
Create original artwork using any of a wide variety of media and techniques.
 
Also called:
Artist, Automotive Artist, Blacksmith, Fine Artist, Ice Carver, Illustrator, Muralist, Painter, Portrait Artist, Sculptor
 
 
Wages
Vermont - 2020
Percentile1HourlyYearly
10% $ 15.15   $31,510  
25% $ 18.65   $38,790  
Median $ 24.61   $51,180  
75% $ 31.03   $64,540  
90% $ 36.83   $76,610  
 
Average $ 25.11   $52,230  
1 What are Percentile Wages?
More at CareerOneStop
 
Industries of Employment
United States - 2018
IndustryPercent of total
  • Self-employed workers
59%
  • Performing arts, spectator sports, and related industries
11%
  • Professional, scientific, and technical services
5%
  • Motion picture and sound recording industries
4%
  • Amusement, gambling, and recreation industries
3%
More at BLS
 
Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Design
    Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Computers and Electronics
    Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • English Language
    Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Production and Processing
    Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Fine Arts
    Knowledge of the theory and techniques required to compose, produce, and perform works of music, dance, visual arts, drama, and sculpture.
More at O*NET
 
Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Active Learning
    Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Critical Thinking
    Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Listening
    Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Judgment and Decision Making
    Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Reading Comprehension
    Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
More at O*NET
 
Interests
People in this career often prefer these work environments:
  • Artistic
    Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
  • Realistic
    Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
What are your interests? Take the O*NET Interest Profiler
 
Work Styles
People in this career will do well at jobs that need:
  • Attention to Detail
    Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Dependability
    Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Integrity
    Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Initiative
    Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
  • Stress Tolerance
    Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
More at O*NET
 
Other Resources
  • CareerOneStop
    resource for job seekers, students, businessess and career professionals
  • O*NET Online
    nation's primary source of occupational information
 
Related Occupations
More at O*NET
 
 
Career Video
 
Projected Employment
 Vermont
2018 employment 244
2028 employment 238
Annual percent change
(compounded)
-0.2%
Annual projected job openings
(due to change and separations)
25
More at Occupational Projections
 
Education and Experience:
  • Typical education needed for entry
    Bachelor's degree
  • Work experience in a related occupation
    None
  • Typical on-the-job training needed to attain competency
    Long-term on-the-job training
Based on BLS Education and Training Classifications
 
Job Zone
Medium Preparation Needed
  • Specific Vocational Preparation Range
    (6.0 to < 7.0) - A typical worker will require over 1 year up to and including 2 years of training to achieve average performance in this occupation.
Based on O*Net Job Zones and SVP
 
Education Level
How much education do most people in this career have?
Education level Percent of
U.S. Workers
Doctoral or professional degree
or post-MA certificate
  0%
Master's degree or
post-BA certificate
  0%
Bachelor's degree   35%
Associate's degree   0%
Certificate or some college,
no degree
  37%
High school diploma
or equivalent
  27%
Less than high school diploma   0%
More at O*NET
 
Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Originality
    The ability to come up with unusual or clever ideas about a given topic or situation, or to develop creative ways to solve a problem.
  • Fluency of Ideas
    The ability to come up with a number of ideas about a topic (the number of ideas is important, not their quality, correctness, or creativity).
  • Visualization
    The ability to imagine how something will look after it is moved around or when its parts are moved or rearranged.
  • Arm-Hand Steadiness
    The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
  • Visual Color Discrimination
    The ability to match or detect differences between colors, including shades of color and brightness.
More at O*NET
 
Work Activities
In general, what you might do:
  • Thinking Creatively
    Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.
  • Getting Information
    Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work
    Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
    Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships
    Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.
More at O*NET
 
Detailed Work Activities
What you might do in a day:
  • Develop artistic or design concepts for decoration, exhibition, or commercial purposes.
  • Build models, patterns, or templates.
  • Construct distinctive physical objects for artistic, functional, or commercial purposes.
  • Arrange artwork, products, or props.
  • Draw detailed or technical illustrations.
More at O*NET
 
Tasks
On the job, you would:
  • Use materials such as pens and ink, watercolors, charcoal, oil, or computer software to create artwork.
  • Integrate and develop visual elements, such as line, space, mass, color, and perspective, to produce desired effects, such as the illustration of ideas, emotions, or moods.
  • Confer with clients, editors, writers, art directors, and other interested parties regarding the nature and content of artwork to be produced.
  • Maintain portfolios of artistic work to demonstrate styles, interests, and abilities.
  • Market artwork through brochures, mailings, or Web sites.
More at O*NET
 
O*NET in-it

This page includes information from the O*NET 25.0 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA.

BLS

This page includes information produced in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics and State Occupational Projecions programs.

 
 
 
 
Vermont.gov State of Vermont Department of Labor