Data & Research
 
* ELMI Occupation Profile - Judicial Law Clerks *
 
Judicial Law Clerks
(O*NET 23-1012.00, SOC 23-1012)
What they do
Assist judges in court or by conducting research or preparing legal documents.
 
Also called:
Appellate Law Clerk, Career Law Clerk, Child Support Officer, Clerk to Justice, Deputy Clerk, Federal Law Clerk, Judicial Assistant, Judicial Clerk, Judicial Law Clerk, Law Clerk
 
 
Wages
Wage rates not available for Vermont
but may be for the nation and other states at
CareerOneStop
 
Industries of Employment
United States - 2018
IndustryPercent of total
  • State government, excluding education and hospitals
50%
  • Local government, excluding education and hospitals
49%
  • Self-employed workers
0%
More at BLS
 
Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Law and Government
    Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
  • English Language
    Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Computers and Electronics
    Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Clerical
    Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
More at O*NET
 
Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Reading Comprehension
    Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening
    Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Critical Thinking
    Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Writing
    Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Speaking
    Talking to others to convey information effectively.
More at O*NET
 
Interests
People in this career often prefer these work environments:
  • Conventional
    Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  • Enterprising
    Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Investigative
    Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
What are your interests? Take the O*NET Interest Profiler
 
Work Styles
People in this career will do well at jobs that need:
  • Integrity
    Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Attention to Detail
    Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Analytical Thinking
    Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
  • Dependability
    Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Independence
    Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
More at O*NET
 
Other Resources
  • CareerOneStop
    resource for job seekers, students, businessess and career professionals
  • O*NET Online
    nation's primary source of occupational information
 
Related Occupations
More at O*NET
 
 
Career Video
 
Projected Employment
Projected employment not available for Vermont
but may be for the nation and other states at
CareerOneStop
 
Education and Experience:
  • Typical education needed for entry
    Doctoral or professional degree
  • Work experience in a related occupation
    None
  • Typical on-the-job training needed to attain competency
    None
Based on BLS Education and Training Classifications
 
Job Zone
Extensive Preparation Needed
  • Specific Vocational Preparation Range
    (8.0 and above) - A typical worker will require over 4 years up to and including 10 years or more of training to achieve average performance in this occupation.
Based on O*Net Job Zones and SVP
 
Education Level
How much education do most people in this career have?
Education level Percent of
U.S. Workers
Doctoral or professional degree
or post-MA certificate
  85%
Master's degree or
post-BA certificate
  0%
Bachelor's degree   0%
Associate's degree   0%
Certificate or some college,
no degree
  7%
High school diploma
or equivalent
  7%
Less than high school diploma   0%
More at O*NET
 
Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Written Comprehension
    The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • Oral Comprehension
    The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Oral Expression
    The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Written Expression
    The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • Deductive Reasoning
    The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
More at O*NET
 
Work Activities
In general, what you might do:
  • Getting Information
    Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards
    Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
    Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates
    Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
  • Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others
    Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.
More at O*NET
 
Detailed Work Activities
What you might do in a day:
  • Research relevant legal materials to aid decision making.
  • Confer with court staff to clarify information.
  • Prepare documentation of legal proceedings.
  • Prepare legal documents.
  • Identify implications for cases from legal precedents or other legal information.
More at O*NET
 
Tasks
On the job, you would:
  • Research laws, court decisions, documents, opinions, briefs, or other information related to cases before the court.
  • Prepare briefs, legal memoranda, or statements of issues involved in cases, including appropriate suggestions or recommendations.
  • Confer with judges concerning legal questions, construction of documents, or granting of orders.
  • Draft or proofread judicial opinions, decisions, or citations.
  • Review complaints, petitions, motions, or pleadings that have been filed to determine issues involved or basis for relief.
More at O*NET
 
O*NET in-it

This page includes information from the O*NET 25.0 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA.

BLS

This page includes information produced in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics and State Occupational Projecions programs.

 
 
 
 
Vermont.gov State of Vermont Department of Labor